Karubaq

Karubaq, was a small fishing village. It was very isolated by land, making it very difficult for any traders or travellers to reach it. The only way to get there was by sea, or a small goat path. It was a simple town and very self-sufficient, meaning trade was uncommon. However, the most common visitors were pilgrims seeking to gain wisdom and enlightenment from the towns leaders. Karubaq is a deeply spiritual place and is the anscestral home of the Msyrh Alwfaq spiritualist religion which promotes harmony and peace to all. The whole town abided by this philosophy, and the culture of the town was deeply rooted within it. The daily routines were based around it, starting with morning meditations and and even include the correct way to thank the fish for the sacrifice they have made.
Karubaq mosque
While the leaders were men, women were highly regarded as nurturers and healers. The roles for the different sexes were very specified. Women spent the vast majority of their early lives learning to care and tend to others. They even learned a good deal of healing and herbalism. Men, however, were taught to be strong, but gentle. They needed to learn how to defend their village and their way of life, but also that peace is always the prefered path. One of the defining moments of a young man’s life was when he reached the age of 18 and must go on his pilgrimage. The purpose of the pilgrimage was to teach the man about the value of other cultures, how people outside of Karubaq live, and most importantly to gain experience and wisdom which was brought back to help enrich the community. Before each boy set off they were given a thick, beautifully made journal; which must be filled with adventures and experiences before the boy can return a man. This pilgrimage often took several years, and some never returned. However, those that do return were given a house of their own and are allowed to take a wife. All boys looked forward to their pilgrimage, and couldn’t wait to learn about the world and who they truely were.

Karubaq now lies in ruin. It was destroyed nearly 500 years ago my a maurading army of hobgoblins. Few villagers survived the attack, but those that did sought refuge in the lands of Salamon, in the Burning Desert. They are now know as Liel. There is little know about those who were on pilgrimage during the destruction, and it is assumed that upon learning of the loss of their home they scattered, to embark on a life long pilgrimage.

Karubaq

Orithia- Skull & Shackles Joezmooman